O-New: Now Extinct Website

Polonaise in A major, Op. 40, No. 1 ‘Military’

…Yeah.

I took my exam in mid-August, I think (I made an announcement around the time with lots of Lyrica-art :P). However, my camera quality SUCKED.

Dunno why but I just realized it doesn’t SUCK, it’s just fairly bad. So, I recorded this.

Funny thing is, it’s been EXACTLY a month (recorded Gallop on the 16th of August, recorded this on the 16th of September).

My mom stole my roll-y table-thingy, so I had to shoot from another angle – between my piano and one of the legs of my bed! Basically, I put a book on top of both (they’re of similar height) and put the camera on the book. Ya can’t see the book because if ya could it’d look silly.

Yes, that’s a bulbasaur in front of those curtains. No, they’re not curtains, those are my clothes and that’s my closet that doesn’t have a door. :V

My bed’s directly on top of the piano, so ya hear lots of reverberation as it’s surrounded on five sides. The side it isn’t surrounded on has me and I’m FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAT that blocks it somewhat as well. OH WELL

I start off really badly because I haven’t played this for a month. Then again, the middle and end are really bad too.

OH WELL

For some background info; Chopin was of French-Polish descent, so he can be called Frédéric François Chopin (what he’s usually called), or Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin. Not sure which one’s easier to spell; the French version sounds simpler but has those c cedilles and e aigus (French class pays off!), and the Polish version just sounds weird. Ymagyne replacyng all those i’s wyth y’s :V

He composed a set of two polonaises; Polonaise in A major, op. 40, no.1, and Polonaise in C minor, op. 40, no… (ya can probably guess which number it is).

When the Nazis invaded Poland, as a protest a radio station broadcast the first polonaise daily. Eventually, the Nazis banned public performances of Chopin and destroyed a statue of him as well.

Some person once remarked that the first was “a symbol of glory, whilst the Polonaise in C minor is the symbol of Polish tragedy”. Though I’m not sure about the second one, and I didn’t play it as it should have sounded like, this polonaise is definitely, very glorious.

Comments are closed.