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Posts tagged “Music

Preludes for Piano, Book 3, No. 3 Ginger Snaps

Welcome to another (late) Musical Monday! Today’s piece of music is titled… wait, I’ll let you guys guess…

..that’s right! It’s titled Friday, featuring the beloved Rebecca Black Ginger Snaps, written by Stephen Chatman in his music collection, Preludes for Piano, Book 3 between 1999 and 2001. Yep, it’s a recent (21st-century!) composition, and as you’d expect from recent compositions, it defies conventions a little bit.

The fies can fence shins»


パラダイム (TV Size) Transcription

Is that what you guys see there! A KOKORO CONNECT OP piano transcription? With sheet music?!

BY MADOKA, IT IS!! Wow!!! Amazing!!!! I should really start watching the anime I’m going to blog this season now instead of transcribing random OPs! …really

Time to watch Naruto and One Piece»


Le Pianiste Virtuose en 60 Exercices, Nos. 21 – 43

It’s time for the long-awaited sequel to Charles-Louis Hanon’s Le Pianiste Virtuose en 60 Exercices!! Well, not really, because Le Pianiste Virtuose en 60 Exercices (The Virtuoso Pianist in 60 Exercises) doesn’t have a sequel. No, this is the sequel to my first post about the Virtuoso Pianist, and in this part, we’ll cover pianos, fingers, and not much else. If you’re reading this series for the first time, do read the first post’s introduction first. Really. Seriously. Honestly. Lie. Wait, no, it’s not a lie, it’s a -ly

We’ve moved past the Preparatory Exercises, so now, it’s time for harder exercises. In fact, you could even say they’re ‘Transcendent Exercises For Preparing The Fingers For The Virtuoso Exercises’. That’s what Hanon says. I mean, said, because he’s dead (hey, that rhymes), which means… woohoo, we’re still doing preparatory exercises…

Prepare to READ»


Engrish Soramimi: Call Me Maybe… Later

Welcome back to another bout of bad Engrish soramimi! Why do I say ‘bad Engrish soramimi’? Because the singer’s Engrish is bad, its inherent badness is Engrish, and my soramimi isn’t actual soramimi, it’s just a bad mondegreen. Why is it a bad mondegreen? Because the singer’s Engrish is bad.

But how can the singer’s Engrish be bad? ‘Call Me Maybe’ is an English song, sung by an English singer, right?

No, we’re not talking about ‘Call Me Maybe’… we’re talking about ‘Call Me Later’, a 1970s R&B song by FOXY.

Wait actually no that’s in English too wait that’s not right

It’s in bad Engrish when played backwards»


Le Pianiste Virtuose en 60 Exercices, Nos. 1 – 20

It’s Musical Monday, and perhaps just playing Czerny all the time has gotten a little boring for you guys. But don’t sweat, because I’ve got something much more exciting prepared, just for you: Hanon exercises, instead!

Charles-Louis Hanon’s Le Pianiste Virtuose en 60 Exercices (The Virtuoso Pianist in 60 Exercise) is an (in)famous collection of (you guessed it) 60 piano exercises, meant for developing finger and wrist strength, agility, endurance, flexbility, suppleness, you name it. Ask any piano teacher or pianist what the most useful book of exercises are for the piano, and half will probably name Hanon’s. Ask the ones that don’t what the most harmful book of exercises are for the piano, and chances are, they’ll probably all name Hanon’s.

But: you must have at least a year of keyboarding experience before starting Hanon practice. Starting it too early will a) dumb down your musical sense b) force you into amateurish hand postures and c) be impossible to play. If you’re here and want to learn how to play piano, Lypur’s ‘Learn How to Play Piano’ playlist is the perfect tutorial for you! Well, maybe it’s not perfect, and maybe it’s not for you, but do give it a shot. (Look, he’s even made a video about the Virtuoso Pianist and Erster Wiener Lehrmeister im Pianofortespiel!)

Like it or hate it, every pianist has encountered Hanon’s exercises sometime in their lifetime. Thus, in this series of posts, I’ll be venturing to play them all. Like a Pokémon master but without the Poké, without the mon, without the mast, and without the er.

Pokémast moner»


Erster Wiener Lehrmeister im Pianofortespiel, Op. 599, Nos. 41 – 60

Two posts ago, I began my quest. My quest to play all 100 exercises in Carl Czerny’s book of beginner piano études, Erster Wiener Lehrmeister im Pianofortespiel. What is a piano étude? Well, my previous post explains this and much less (that is to say, it does not explain much more than this), and I strongly suggest you start from the very beginning if you are trying to learn piano.

Actually, if you are trying to learn piano, I strongly suggest you do not try Czerny’s piano exercises at all. The learning curve is too steep, and without a proper piano teacher, your form and posture will be all incorrect. I do not count as a proper piano teacher because my form and posture is already incorrect and its incorrectness is already incorrigible.

This post, we’ll talk about posture, technique, and another guy, Hanon, ‘s exercises. That’s improper grammar and punctuation, but I want to pronounce ‘Hanon’ with pauses at each end, and ‘s exercises together as one word, because English is stupid and French liaisons sound really, really good. Unlike my performances of the following exercises.

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Erster Wiener Lehrmeister im Pianofortespiel, Op. 599, Nos. 21 – 40

Last post, I announced my great expedition to record all 100 exercises from Carl Czerny’s book of études, Erster Wiener Lehrmeister im Pianofortespiel (no, don’t ask me how to pronounce that).

This Musical Monday, you will learn about accidentals and key signatures, the qualities of an étude, and of the history behind this collection.

But without further ado, let us begin with post two (hey, that was a rhyming couplet!).

These rhymes I’ll continue, and ah-ah-ah-achooo»